Floor Pan Replacement

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Floors LH and RH were rust damaged and required replacing. The floors were replaced one side at a time after the sills were repaired. Replacement floors were sourced at a swap meet. The price was right for the Steelcraft 62-67 lefthand and righthand floors and no shipping. Tools used for the task were an air chisel, air body saw, angle grinder with 36 and 50 grit disks, dremel with a oval shaped carbide bit, hammer, chisel, drill, air flange/hole punch, and MiG welder. Always wear the safety equipment like gloves, eye and hearing protection. The floors or what were left of them had been removed as the sill work proceeded on each side of the car. The top of the floor was marked as to which sections can be cut out with the air saw. The remaining pieces were removed by grinding down the spot welds with the dremel tool and using the air chisel to separate the spot welds. Once the floor is removed clean the surfaces with the angle grinder. Care was must be taken to save the edge on the side member, gearbox tunnel, and rear deck that the new floor panel will have ample surface area for attachment. Another area to be careful when cutting out the rusted floor is at the cross member and inner member. When the floor is removed areas under the panel, such as the cross member, can be cleaned and coated with a rust preventative paint. The Steelcraft 62-67 floors do not come with the fittings attached such as the captive nuts for the seats, studs for wiring, fuel, and brake lines clamps. Holes needed to be cut for the drain plugs and the scuttle plates added to keep that original concours appearance. The floors are made with extra material that extends up the side member and gearbox tunnel. This material was trimmed off and the floor pan was flanged along the edges. Holes were punched or drilled in the floor pan an inch to inch and a half apart To weld the new floor in place. A weight was used to help hold the floor tight while plug welding. The entire bottom of the car was cleaned to bare metal and coated with epoxy primer. A color tinted truck bed liner was sprayed over the epoxy primer to finish the chassis.

Reference: MGB Guide to Purchase and DIY Restoration by Lindsay Porter, Middlebank UK Coachwork, Floors